Scrap Busting Mom and Mini DIY Aprons

1 Material
$3
2 Hours
Easy

Make your friends and your little ones adorable matching aprons. With this simple tutorial, you can easily make these bigger or smaller to fit whoever you are making them for.

Mom's Apron


Kid's Apron

These are the base measurements I started with for the adult(sz 8-10) and the kids(sz 6-8) aprons. I customized each one 1/2 inch bigger or smaller for individual sizes.

You will need roughly 2 yards of fabric per apron. The fabric I used was 100% quilters cotton. It's easy to find at your local fabric store and there is always tons of options. You can use a neutral or fun contrasting colors for each part of the apron. This is a great scrap busting project. Get creative, use your imagination!

Measure and Cutout Your Apron Pieces.

Using the above measurements cut out all of your apron pieces.

  •  Adult : 1 Back, 3 Ruffles and 1 Waist Sash.
  • Kids1 Back, 4 Ruffles, 1 Waist Sash.

After you cut out all the pieces, finish the edges to the backing with either a zig-zag stitch or a serger. For the back of my apron, I used an old cotton table cloth I never used.

Preparing the Ruffles

It's a good idea to finish the edges of the ruffles using a zig-zag stitch or serger. Hem only one long side on each ruffle 1/4". This will be the bottom of each ruffle. The top side doesn’t need hemmed because it will be gathered.

I didn’t bother hemming the sides of the ruffles because I used a serger and finished them. I just turned them under a bit when I was attaching them. If you want to, you can turn the sides under 1/4 and stitch in place. It’s gathered so it wont be super noticeable. It’s just preference.

Mark Your Ruffle Guidelines

For the adult apron I placed a small dot on each side of the apron backing every 5 inches. I then drew a line attaching the dots so that I had a straight line to follow for attaching each ruffle. You can see it on the above picture. For the little girls apron I placed a dot down each side every 3 inches and drew a line to connect them. Attach the ruffles along each line, making sure the top ruffle overlaps the one under it 2-3 inches for the adults and 1-2 inches for the kids.

Gathering the Ruffles

On each ruffle, sew a basting stitch on the long side you didn’t hem and gather your ruffles. Or gather it in your preferred method. The apron shape is slightly angled to be more narrow at the top and wider at the bottom. The top ruffle will be gathered the most, and the bottom will be gathered the least.

Pin the ruffles along the lines you created in the above step, adjusting the gathers as you go to fit the apron. Sew in place.

All Ruffles Attached

Once you have all the ruffles attached to the back of the apron it should look like this. Now you are ready to do the waist sash.

The Waist Sash

For the adult waist sash you may need to sew together two pieces of fabric of the same length to make it long enough. Just make sure that the seam is placed neatly in the middle front. You won't need to finish the edges of the sash because they are all going to be enclosed.

Prepping the Waist Sash

Using an iron and steam turn ALL the edges under 1/4″. Then fold the sash in half the long way and iron again. This helps when attaching it to the apron.

Marking the Middle Front

Mark the middle front of the apron and Sash with a pin. If you used two equal lengths of fabric to make your sash, your seam seam should be in the middle front.

Pinning the Sash to the Apron

Starting in the middle front, pin the apron in place right at the 1/4″ ironed edge of the sash. The top of the apron will be enclosed in the sash. Pin all the way to the and of the sash.

Attching the Sash

Once the sash is pined to the apron it should look like this. Sew the sash from one end to the next making sure to sew the ends of the sash closed.

All Done!

You’re all done! Now repeat 6 more times and you have enough to give to your friends and their daughters!

Mom and Mini Aprons

Suggested materials:

  • 2 yards contrasting 100% quilters cotton  (local fabric store)

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